Mumps Exposure at FFA Convention

>Mumps Exposure at FFA Convention

Mumps Exposure at FFA Convention

 

This bulletin is being sent to local health officers, local health department nurses, tribal health directors, and key DPH staff.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services have been notified by the Indiana State Department of Health and Marion County Public Health Department than an exhibitor at the 2019 National FFA Convention & Expo has tested positive for the mumps. The two dates of potential exposure were October 30 and 31, 2019. Public health officials have confirmed that the risk of transmission to others is extremely low. If there are students or other individuals in your jurisdiction who attended the convention, they should be notified of the potential exposure and be informed of the signs and symptoms of mumps illness.

Signs and symptoms include low grade fever, headache, muscle pain, and general feeling of discomfort. Commonly, the cheek and jaw area (salivary glands) swell on one or both sides within the first two days of illness. Infected persons start to show signs of mumps two to three weeks after exposure.

If an individual develops symptoms, he/she should contact their health care provider prior to arriving at the clinic, urgent care, or emergency department to inform them of the potential exposure to mumps.

Proof of immunity to mumps includes:

  • Birth before January 1, 1957 (unless health care personnel), OR
  • Serologic proof of immunity, OR
  • Documentation of adequate vaccination with live mumps vaccine:
    • One dose for preschool-aged children and adults not at high risk of infection
    • Two doses for school-aged children (grades K-12) and for adults at high risk (health care personnel, international travelers, and students at post-high school educational institutions)

Individuals without proof of immunity are recommended to receive MMR (Mumps, Measles, Rubella) vaccination. Students may still attend school as long as they have no signs or symptoms of mumps illness.

2019-11-06T18:03:02+00:00November 6, 2019|Immunizations, Public Health, School Health|